V.E347

Take a Superhero to Lunch

Take a Superhero to Lunch

After viewing a selection of lunch boxes depicting images of superheroes (heroic characters with special talents), students will be presented with the following scenario: The gift shop in a large art museum wants to sell lunch boxes featuring sculptures of famous heroes throughout history. In order to make the lunch boxes appeal to children their age, the gift shop wants students to select one of the images presented and tell why they think the image should appear on the lunch boxes.

This item has been voluntarily field-tested by Michigan teachers with a non-representative sample of students.


This is an analytic rubric. The column on the left shows the dimension that is being measured in the student’s performance. The levels across the top row indicate the performance level in the dimensions. Occasionally all dimensions and performance levels are exemplified by multiple students in a single recording.

TEACHER SCORING RUBRIC—DESCRIPTION OF WHY YOU CHOSE THAT HERO

  • Dimension
  • Content

  • Interpretation

  • Rationale

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • Student identifies only the hero.

    N/A at this time.
  • Student identifies the hero but does not identify the hero’s deeds.

    N/A at this time.
  • Student identifies the hero and briefly describes the hero’s deeds.

    N/A at this time.
  • Student identifies the hero and uses details and expressive language to describe the hero’s deeds.

    N/A at this time.
  • Response fails to describe student’s thinking. Student does not refer to artistic elements or describe any of the following three aspects of the sculpture: what the hero is doing, what the sculpture tells us about the hero’s physical characteristics, or what the sculpture suggests about the character of the hero.

    N/A at this time.
  • Student does not refer to artistic elements. Student describes one of the following three aspects of the sculpture: what the hero is doing, what the sculpture tells us about the hero’s physical characteristics, what the sculpture suggests about the character of the hero.

    N/A at this time.
  • Student refers to one artistic element. Student describes two of the following three aspects of the sculpture: what the hero is doing, what the sculpture tells us about the hero’s physical characteristics, or what the sculpture suggests about the character of the hero.

    N/A at this time.
  • Student refers to two or more artistic elements. Student describes what the hero is doing, what the sculpture tells us about the hero’s physical characteristics, and what the sculpture suggests about the character of the hero. Responses use expressive language.

    N/A at this time.
  • Student’s description of the hero’s accomplishment is unclear and fails to describe what makes the sculpture appealing to sixth-grade students.

    N/A at this time.
  • Student either names one accomplishment that causes the
    hero to be remembered or describes one aspect of the sculpture that makes it appealing to sixth-grade students.

    N/A at this time.
  • Student names one accomplishment that causes the hero to be remembered and describes one aspect of the sculpture that makes it appealing to sixth-grade students.

    N/A at this time.
  • Student uses expressive language to name one accomplishment that causes the hero to be remembered and to describe two or more aspects of the sculpture that make it appealing to sixth-grade students.

    N/A at this time.
Having trouble viewing videos?

Leave Feedback for this Assessment

What did you like? Did you need to revise anything? How could we make this assessment better?
Our Assessments are written by teachers for you, so your feedback is important to us!

Comments about items may be moderated and/or reposted in the blogs to aid item improvement and teacher learning. By leaving a comment, you agree that we can use your comment without attributing it to you.

Sign up for our newsletter to stay up to date with all of our assessments.

Sign Up Now!